Events

Jun
27
Sat
ISMB2015 – The XXVI International Symposium on Molecular Beams @ Parador Nacional de Segovia
Jun 27 – Jul 3 all-day

ISMB2015 is the XXVI Edition of the Molecular Beams Conference series and will take place in Segovia, Spain, from the 28th of June to the 3rd of July 2015. The venue will be Parador Nacional de Segovia, an outstanding hotel and convention center located very close to medieval Segovia downtown, UNESCO Heritage city since 1985.

ISMB2015 will bring together scientists from all over the world to present and discuss the most recent advances in Molecular Beams Science, including reaction and photodissociation dynamics of neutral and ion molecules, ultrafast dynamics and coherent control, cold molecules, biomolecules, molecular clusters and helium droplets, liquid micro-jets and aerosols, beam-surface collisions, with contributions from both theory and experiment.

Following the tradition of the last Conferences, in this occasion ISMB2015 is dedicated to two outstanding scientists whose contributions and impact on Molecular Beams Science have been fundamental: Piergiorgio Casavecchia and Mike Ashfold, who will deliver plenary lectures in a special session in the afternoon of July 2, 2015.

The Conference format will include invited lectures, oral presentations selected among the abstract contributions, and poster sessions. The participation of young researchers and students is particularly welcome.

The day of arrival is Sunday, June 28, 2015, with registration during the afternoon and a reception in the evening. The program starts on Monday, June 29, 2015. The Conference will finish on the 3rd of July at midday, after a closure session.

Further information can be found on the conference web site: http://www.ucm.es/ismb which will be kept updated with the most recent news.

On behalf of the ISMB2015 Organizing Committee,
Javier Aoiz & Luis Bañares (Chairs)

Jan
23
Mon
WG1&WG2 Expert Meeting: From Ultrafast to Ultraslow Dynamics in Molecules and Clusters @ Weizmann Institute of Science
Jan 23 – Jan 25 all-day
WG1&WG2 Expert Meeting: From Ultrafast to Ultraslow Dynamics in Molecules and Clusters @ Weizmann Institute of Science | Israel

The XLIC WG1&WG2 Expert Meeting “From Ultrafast to Ultraslow Dynamics in Molecules and Clusters” will be held in the Weizmann Institute of Science Israel , from 23th to 25th January  2017.The Meeting  is jointly organized by the Local organizing committee, the team of the conference unit of the  Weizmann Institute and COST CM1204 Action (XLIC).
The workshop participation is open to everybody.

Scope and Program of the Meeting

Dynamical processes in molecular and cluster systems play an important role in different disciplines of  research including atmospheric and interstellar chemistry, biology, nano-science and more. It is appealing to classify different types of dynamics according to their time scale – from attosecond electronic dynamics, femtosecond and picosecond ro-vibrational motion up to typical nanosecond times of spontaneous radiative processes. However, even in small clusters and biomolecules, coupling of many degree’s of freedom can lead to ultra-slow dynamics extending up to millisecond times.
In recent years, experimental techniques for studying these different dynamics have considerably advanced – from the development of ultrafast light sources, including high-order harmonic generation and free electron laser X-ray facilities, as well as highly controlled ion traps and ion storage rings that allow following a slow evolving time evolution of isolated molecular and cluster ions. On the theoretical side, quantum mechanical calculations provide insight regarding short time scales, while statistical models can describe long time dynamics on the ensemble level.
These communities have developed in parallel and often with little interaction with each-other. The goal of this workshop  will be to bridge the gap between the different communities towards a full understanding of molecular and cluster dynamics. For example, it will be valuable to understand the role of initial ultrafast electronic and vibrational rearrangement of an isolated system on its slow decay by statistical fragmentation. Does ultrafast dynamics leading to internal conversion influence delayed recurrent fluorescence events? What is the importance of the coherent vibrational motion for long term processes and spectroscopic probes of isolated interstellar environments or biomolecular systems?
We aim at achieving this goal by bringing together leading experts from the different fields: including atto-second science, femto-chemistry, action spectroscopy, ion storage devices, time-dependent quantum mechanics and statistical physics – in order to promote a common language and shared goals. In particular, participants will be asked to highlight the scientific goals and challenges of each field to promote collaborative efforts. We hope that this conference will generate long term collaborations that will advance our understanding of molecular and cluster science across  the different time scales.

Immportant dates

Abstract Submission Deadline: November 1st, 2016
Registration Deadline: January 5th, 2017

Registration

Click here to register

List of invited speakers

Noam Agmon, Hebrew University, Israel
Lars H. Andersen, Aarhus University, Denmark
Itzik Ben-Itzhak, Kansas State University, USA
Valerie Blanchet, CELIA, Bordeaux, France
Anastasia Bochenkova, Moscow State University, Russia
Steen Brondsted Nielsen, Aarhus University, Denmark
Philip Bucksbaum, Stanford, USA
Francesca Calegari, Politecnico Milano, Italy
Lorenz Cederbaum, University of Heidelberg, Germany
Henrik Cederquist, Stockholm University, Sweden
Brett Esry, Kansas State University, USA
Sharly Fleischer, Tel-Aviv University, Israel
Jason Greenwood, Queen’s University Belfast, UK
Christiane Koch, Universität Kassel, Germany
Ronni Kosloff, Hebrew University, Israel
Holger Kreckel, MPI-K Heidelberg, Germany
Stephen Leone, UC Berkeley, USA
Nimrod Moiseyev, Technion, Israel
Edvardas Narevicius, Weizmann Institute, Israel
Daniel Neumark, UC Berkeley USA
Thomas Pfeifer, MPI-K Heidelberg, Germany
Igor Schapiro, Hebrew University, Israel
Haruo Shiromaru, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Japan
Jan. R. R. Verlet, Durham University, UK
Mathias Weber, JILA, Colorado, USA
Roland Wester, Universität Innsbruck , Austria

May
7
Mon
CECAM School: Theoretical Solid State Chemistry: theory, modelling, and simulation @ CECAM HQ
May 7 – May 11 all-day
CECAM School: Theoretical Solid State Chemistry: theory, modelling, and simulation @ CECAM HQ | Lausanne | Vaud | Switzerland

Although computer simulation of the electronic structure and properties of solids began decades ago, only recently the solid state methodologies have become sufficiently reliable that their application has resulted in an increasingly important impact on solid state chemistry and physics. , While a large number of course and tutorials already exists, they are mainly focused on audiences with strong background on solid state physics, and usually devoted to some particular electronic structure code. Far more unusual are the courses designed to teach the solid-state techniques to chemists, thus contributing to eliminate the cultural barriers that still exist between both groups. This school is primarily targeted to PhD students and post docs who are interested or are starting to learning about the application theory methods and techniques to the study of the physics and chemistry of the solid state.

The level of this tutorial corresponds to master or doctorate students in areas of physics and chemistry. After two initial days where the fundamentals of theory of the treatment of the electronic structure of solids will be presented to the students, the remaining of the tutorial will be devoted to the examination of specific and hot areas like characterization of chemical bonding in solids and relationship to macroscopic properties, structure and reactivity at solid surfaces, including layered systems and highly correlated oxides, and magnetic properties. The afternoons will be dedicated to practical hand-on tutorials. Several computational codes are actively being developed, capable of simulating molecules, pure and defective crystals, surface and transport properties, and reactive processes in the bulk and interfaces. Getting familiar with the different codes and their possibilities requires an adequate training that merges theory and practice in substantial amounts.

More info at: https://www.cecam.org/workshop-1553.html